Fitness DVDs, health club or outdoor activities. Can’t decide which is right for you? With money being tight these days, you might consider a personal home workout with fitness DVDs to get your weekly dose of cardio. Here are a few advantages to consider.

1.  It adds variety to your workout. There are so many different types of fitness DVDs on the market to choose from. There’s tai chi, heavy duty iron pumping, dance workouts, power step aerobics and kickboxing to name a few. There are many more varieties of workouts than you will ever get at one gym. There are also different levels of fitness DVDs. You may find more challenging routines on a DVD than at a local health club.

2.  It’s quite affordable for most people.  Instead of buying an expensive home gym or paying hundreds of dollars a year for a gym membership, try getting a nice assortment of fitness DVDs. You may need to also buy a set of dumbbells, aerobics shoes and an exercise mat. You’re all set to go!

3.  Weather can never hamper your workout. If you normally enjoy walking, cycling or running, this is an excellent alternative way to stay in shape until the weather clears up.

4.  You have all the privacy you need. If you tend to feel self-conscious about going to the gym because you are out of shape or overweight, fitness DVDs may be right for you. You can wear whatever you like and never have to worry about keeping up with rest of the fitness class.

5.  It’s so convenient. Consider the fact that you would never have to drive to the gym after work. If you can get into a habit, why not make a point to pop in your DVD at a set time every day for your workout.

6.  You can always reverse the DVD.  If you missed something that the instructor is saying or like to do a certain part of the routine more than others that’s easy to do. Remember to always keep moving to keep your heart rate up.

Fitness DVDs are a great way to ease into a regular workout routine. If either your time or money is tight, this form of fitness might be right for you.



Source by Theresa Kruger